Discussion » Beijing Life » Copied from a China Law Blog commenter

  • 叮噹叔叔 (令狐叮噹)
    叮噹叔叔 (令狐叮噹) wrote:
    <p>...</p> <p><em>Hahahaha ... this was an interesting way to spend a few minutes on Facebook ... because there is no simple way to share things, I had to copy it (not sure about the original source) ...</em></p> <p>As a 15 year expat who has lived in several Chinese cities (and with no kids by the way) I would say the main problem is overall the quality of life is getting lower and lower. Other then having Starbucks, Walmart and Ikea, a lot of things which made life in China enjoyable or at least bearable have actually deteriorated rather then improved.</p> <ul> <li>The pollution just gets worse and worse. Leave China for a day or even go to the countryside for a wake-up call. In Beijing, most "overcast cast" days are actually simply pollution. Its off the charts. - Speaking Chinese and living full time in China, accelerates this process as you are able to come closer to the culture with a deeper understanding and at a faster rate. Unfortunately, whats underneath is not very pretty. China today is (sadly) fast becoming rotten to the core.</li> <li>Doing business, especially when its your own money also accelerates the process. The constant stream of headaches, mafan, chabaduo, ineptitude and dishonesty just makes things all the more unpleasant and challenging.</li> <li>Traffic is out of control. A 15 minute trip can take two hours at the wrong time of day. And getting taxi's in Beijing is now much more difficult.</li> <li>We have all known for a long time that the food is poisonous. There is a new food scandal every day. At least the Chinese themselves are now waking up themselves to this fact which is positive.</li> <li>Unless you use Baidu, Tudou, ren ren and weibo, the internet is completely useless without a VPN. </li> <li>For Beijing, the weather is horrible. Short/non-existent spring and fall and very hot summer/cold winter. Shanghai's humidity and lack of heat in the winter is not that much better. This isn't anyone's fault but over time it does get to some people. </li> <li>Attitudes towards foreigners started changing around the time of the Beijing Olympics and have continued to deteriorate. Previously the common man had a certain polite curiosity and open mindedness about the world, even regarding topics they disagreed on. Now its become more of an arrogant "chip on the shoulder" which leaves us with the impression something is going to boil over sooner or later.</li> <li>Rents are out of control in most major cities. Landlords generally are still horrible to deal with and renters rights are non-existent. Purchasing is an option only for the rich. And that new complex you live in which was built only a few years ago has now become an un-maintained falling apart slum.</li> <li>Costs of labor (and just about everything else) are skyrocketing and good labor is hard to find. 15 years later and most people still have an attitude of "chaobaduo" + how much are you gonna pay me? At some point it doesn't seem worth it.</li> <li>Most Chinese today have become focused exclusively and only on one thing: money. This supersedes face, national pride, family and just about everything else. The end game is always about money. It was not always this way. Unfortunately, the longer you are here, the more ethics, professionalism and honesty become alien concepts to you which is not necessarily a positive thing.</li> <li>Laws and regulations remain confusing and frustrating and may have gotten even more confusing since this "China has laws" idea started taking root (something which is often promoted on this blog and understandably since the authors are lawyers - no ill ill meaning intended). The reality is, rule of law in China is still mostly a myth. All Chinese know that law in China still remains primarily a tool to be selectively used by the authorities when needed and when its to their advantage.</li> </ul> <p>The more you localize and the longer you are here, the more you become somewhat Chinese. Which means you start to hate many of the same things they hate themselves. The only difference is we discuss it openly and with a foreign passport, we can pack up a leave, something even most mainlanders aspire to. Most of us came here because we loved China and Chinese culture (and likely still do). But at some point, enough is enough. Couple that with the fact that many things foreigners hoped would gradually improve have either not improved at the rate we had hoped or instead actually deteriorated and it makes for a very depressing outlook. </p> <p>However, with that said, I think China's greatest success has been in creating a perception that China is "the place to be." Which means yes, a new stream of naive foreigners will continue to arrive every day.</p>
  • 叮噹叔叔 (令狐叮噹)

    ...

    (continued) ...

    We do hate all those ourselves,

    At least they always have a choice of leaving, while we can only continue to hope to see changes, which seems too blurry to reach.

    We? Heehee ... that's funny ...

  • Sonja Lund
    Sonja Lund wrote:

    @Lao lee

    "It is nothing but a manifestation of ones frustration......once the words are out,one feels better...."

    Cant be more agree with you,spit spammer is the best example.

  • 叮噹叔叔 (令狐叮噹)

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    (continued) ...

    I dare to speak on behalf of those citizens that have the same sense and values as mine.

    Hahahaha ... and some of those are probably in the Party ... I wonder if you would "dare" to do the same on Chinese-language based forums ... I wonder ...

    Didn't really see any constructive comments on China's Law

    It was NOT meant to be ... you should know that ...

  • 叮噹叔叔 (令狐叮噹)

    ...

    (continued) ... heehee ... that was then, this is now ...

  • Alex ^∞
    Alex ^∞ wrote:

    I think China's greatest success has been in creating a perception that China is "the place to be."

    Correct.

  • 叮噹叔叔 (令狐叮噹)

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    (continued) ...

    So the bottom-line is either you take the standard they set for you or you get the hell out of their land.

    Hahahaha ... have you looked around this forum lately?

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