Discussion » Beijing Life » Have u found your changes of body when you came to

  • Hana
    Hana wrote:
    <p>Food and drink here are pretty dangerous,have u heard and felt it?</p>
  • 叮噹叔叔 (令狐叮噹)

    。。。

    Hahahahaha ... yes, but there is nothing we can do, other than leave ... I once bought some bread, and when I was down to the last slice, because it is small, I never got around to eat it and just left it at the back of the fridge, and even after a month, it still looked fresh, which is abnormal ...

  • pommie
    pommie wrote:

    I look several years older than I did when I arrived in China.

    Something is afoot!

  • Ajantha Manohar

    only a matter of food and drink? You got It wrong

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  • Alex ^∞
    Alex ^∞ wrote:

    Thats weird.....I came here and found the fountain of eternal youth. Ive not aged in the last few years, instead, i seem to be getting younger and fresher. I think it might have somthing to do with all the virgin's blood im drinking....and the apple I eat every day. Seriously though....for about the first year I lived here i felt queezy about 75% of the time. Now its all good.

  • 叮噹叔叔 (令狐叮噹)

    ...

    (continued) ... no, Alex plus or minus, refer to my above comment ... it has to do with all the preservative you have eaten ...

  • Alex ^∞
    Alex ^∞ wrote:

    @ 叮噹叔叔 (令狐叮噹) , no, it doesnt. Pomeh, have you by any chance been here for several years?

  • 叮噹叔叔 (令狐叮噹)

    ...

    Hahahahaha ... unless these virgins came from out of space, the preservative they have eaten in China would have gone into your system nonetheless, so, I am afraid so ...

  • Alex ^∞
    Alex ^∞ wrote:

    but, im afraid not....

  • 叮噹叔叔 (令狐叮噹)

    ...

    (continued) ... be afraid ... be very afraid ...

    Sorry, just have to say it ...

  • Alex ^∞
    Alex ^∞ wrote:

    I assume that Edward's were fed on either PAL or Hoggets Finest Farmyard Feed lolol

  • Alex ^∞
    Alex ^∞ wrote:

    mental environment: yeah...the environment here is mental.
    I would add, from my experience and the experience of people whos opinions I highly value, stress ages a person faster than almost anything

  • Alex ^∞
    Alex ^∞ wrote:

    I attribute my lack of aging in recent years, not to, like Uncle DD suggests, eating too many food preservatives; rather that I pretty much hit the peak of potential life stress somewhere in '07, where i realised that should it continue any longer I would be dead before the beijing olympics. It was arount that point i managed to banish all stress from my life, hence I now expect to live to approximately 130, as long as I can give up smoking before my final 100 years :D

  • 叮噹叔叔 (令狐叮噹)

    。。。

    Hahahahaha ... Alex plus or minus ... dont worry, somehow I am convinved that you will still be here after most of us have gone ...

    Tara or Tata ... I call it a "downgrade of living standard" ... when I returned from Oz to Hong Kong, I was sick for about a month ... when I came to Beijing, I was sick for about half a year ... even when my wife, as a BJ home grown, was sick for about two months when she came back in 2005, after living in Oz for only a few years ...

  • pommie
    pommie wrote:

    For Tara.

    http://www.funnyordie.com/videos/23e6bd5026/not-giving-a-fuck-jon-lajoie-from-jon-lajoie

  • 叮噹叔叔 (令狐叮噹)

    。。。

    Hahahahaha ... and when I thought everyone already knows that I want to leave?

  • DonkeyTonk
    DonkeyTonk wrote:

    I'm 25 KG heavier since arriving in China. In the first three months I actually lost weight though. Once I could read and speak a bit of Chinese I started to pile on the weight.

    I blame:

    • Cheap taxis. Means I walk less than if I were in say London.
    • Low alcohol percentage Tsing Dao / Yan Jing (Need to drink a lot to feel alcohol effects).
    • High fat chinese food.
    • Low availibilty of low carb snacks
    • Hard to count calories (Most food here doesn't have them).
    • High carb diet of rice and noodles.
    • I tend to eat our a whole lot more here.
    • Innability to judge when I'm full and end up eating everything ordered (In the UK, by contrast, I order 1 plate for myself, I'll finish the plate and that's it).
    • Lethargy to exercise when pollution is high.
    • Being fat doesn't disgust as many girls here as in the UK. Many actually prefer it. This gives less motivation to fit-up.
    • Long work hours, usually finish 7pm at the latest, often after 9pm.

    Loads of excuses here but basically it comes down to moving less and eating more.

  • Alex ^∞
    Alex ^∞ wrote:

    I find copious amounts of sex tend to keep levels under control ;-)

    yes

  • Alex ^∞
    Alex ^∞ wrote:

    Funny in the context of frumpy, lard-arsed British women demanding standards from their men that they fall so tragically short of themselves.

    Not funny. Depressing and disgusting. Only funny in a sort of deeply tragic, ironic way. If it isnt the weather forcing brits abroad, its the economy, if it isnt the economy its the looting rioting chav scum, if it isnt the chav scum its the PC/'elf and safety brigade, if its not PC 'elf and safety brigade its the women who basically look and sound like anemic sows. Aside from a few high quality exceptions to the rule, English women are without a doubt, as a group, the ugliest in Europe, dare I say the developed world, dare I say the world. They usually look OK between the ages of approximately 17 and of 22, or halfway through university, whichever comes first, after which point they have drank 50 times their weight in each of beer and wine, giving them the appearance of pink blancmanges except without any of the sweetness associated.

  • DonkeyTonk
    DonkeyTonk wrote:

    See my responses below. Most of these can be summed up as "excuses". My inability to adapt is the man reason I've put on weight...

    "High fat chinese food" hmmm, really??What?
    Almost every dish in a Chinese restaurant. Even the salads or cold dishes are drenched in oil.

    "Low availibilty of low carb snacks" True, but isn't it better to simply cut it out, lol. Yes true, but sometimes I just need to grab something quick at lunch from a shop. The choices are small. In the UK, I could always find some healthy lunch time snacks from most convenience stores.

    "Hard to count calories (Most food here doesn't have them)" Did you really do that back in the UK? Calculate calories of what you eat?
    Yes, I did a lot of calorie counting, and most people I know will be aware of calories and the food they are eating in the UK. Almost every single food item you buy will have the calories printed on the front of the food. Even if you walk into a fast food restaurant, they will show it on the menus. Just like this: alt text

    "Innability to judge when I'm full and end up eating everything ordered (In the UK, by contrast, I order 1 plate for myself, I'll finish the plate and that's it)" Innability to judge when you're full? Not sure how it can be affected by how big the plate is or how many plates the food is put in.. it's the same amount that makes you full, right?
    I think this comes down to culture. In the UK, I tend to make enough food that I think will make me full. Same is if I go to a restaurant. I order a dish that will make me full. I'll usually eat the whole plate and then be finished. Sometimes it was a little to much, and sometimes it wasn't enough. But the point is, I feel obligated to eat the whole plate. It's how we were brought up. In China, I've found a tendency for people to often order much more food than they really need, especially in group situations. People eat until they feel full. I struggle to really know when I'm full and feel obligated to finish more of my food. I think it comes down to the cultural thing. Chinese have been trained to learn when they feel full a lot better than westerners (at least myself) have been taught.

  • Simen Wangberg

    "Chinese have been trained to learn when they feel full a lot better than westerners (at least myself) have been taught."

    Interesting. My girlfriend never seems to be able to tell when she's full, she'll keep eating until she's physically uncomfortable if there's still food on the table. On the other hand, I barely eat enough food to remain functioning, so we make it work between us.

  • Alex ^∞
    Alex ^∞ wrote:

    The carbs are broken down into glucose which then goes to the liver and muscles to be used for energy.

    sort of. the glucose is converted to glycogen first, before it is stored in the liver and muscles.. the trick is understanding what and when "it" (food) gets stored as sugar reserve (glycogen) and when it gets converted into those lovely little high energy cells we know as fat... the other trick is knowing how, when and by what means to exercise in order to burn each differently stored fuel source in the best possible way to achieve the body type desired.

  • Ajantha Manohar

    karmic bump

  • Ajantha Manohar

    WOW! Look at what the tide has left behind! Welcome Back Swag!!

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  • 随便叫兽
  • Alex ^∞
    Alex ^∞ wrote:

    @Yanis yay for SP God.

  • pommie
    pommie wrote:

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  • pommie
    pommie wrote:

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  • pommie
    pommie wrote:

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  • Alex ^∞
    Alex ^∞ wrote:

    horrible chipped nail varnish...

  • pommie
    pommie wrote:

    Exfats - foreigners who have put on a large amount of weight since moving to China.

  • Ajantha Manohar

    @Tara, you should share with all us some pics to prove it

    ヽ(´ー`)┌

  • Ajantha Manohar

    when foreigners come to china guys lose weight without trying

    They try it, they do a lot of sport

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  • Ajantha Manohar

    Yes I agree most men lose weight in china since chinese food is healthier.

    Chinese food is healthier than what? American food?

    " What A Revelation !!!"

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    Personally I count all asians such as thai, malay, Indonesian as chinese as well.

    U.S. citizens and their geographic Illiteracy. Fortunately they don't need learn a second language.

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  • Simen Wangberg

    "Personally I count all asians such as thai, malay, Indonesian as chinese as well."

    Right. Just like how the Huangyan Islands have been an indisputable part of Chinese territory since ancient times and China's sovereignty over the islands is absolute and indisputable.

    WTF come on

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