Discussion » Software Development » WIFI password cracking softwares

  • Aravinda Gayan
    Aravinda Gayan wrote:
    <p>Does anyone know about WIFI password cracking softwares? which allow us to use password protected WIFI networks..someone help ! do you know from where could i find ?</p>
  • Alex ^∞
    Alex ^∞ wrote:

    OP wants to hack the shit out of China then have whoever's connection he stole thrown in jail for "all sorts of crimes".

    alt text

    The policeman remind! (thumbs up)

  • Le lyriciste Bantou

    Get use to the chinese way of life or fuck offff,I hate stupid foreigners who believe they can go anywhere and impose their culture or way of life.

  • Le lyriciste Bantou

    fuck it was ,for the other topic about the guy who talk about spliting,what`s wrong with this website.

  • 随便叫兽
    随便叫兽 wrote:

    Get use to the chinese way of life or fuck offff,I hate stupid foreigners who believe they can go anywhere and impose their culture or way of life.

    I wanted this comment to be applicable to this thread. I really did.

    ...

    @Everyone upstairs who is concerned that WiFi cracking will be used to steal teh Internets is jumping to conclusions; that's really the least one could imagineer with such tools.

    Moreover, router fuckery and the abstract crime of "bandwidth theft" is more legally complex than any of you understand because the data connection goes both ways. That's right. I could come over to your house and steal all your Internets right fucking now without any secret hacking software because you're probably one of those dumb cunts like me who leaves their router login and password set to the factory defaults anyway. But it doesn't matter who raped your network if it was asking for it. Wireless devices "passively" send connection requests all the time.

    Anyway, the Internet is not just a public place. It is the public place, and service providers are mere bureaucratic gatekeepers at best, and racketeering highwaymen at worst. Y'all sound like a bunch of tourists tricked into overpaying the toll to cross a poorly-maintained bridge, thinking it was the only way to get here. But if you seriously think you have more of a right to be here than someone who jumped across where the river was narrower, then GTFO.

  • 叮噹叔叔 (令狐叮噹)

    ...

    Hahahahaha ... seriously, in a country where internet connection is already very cheap, why would you want to steal?

  • 叮噹叔叔 (令狐叮噹)

    ...

    (continued) ... if you were referring to the locals whose priority is about making a living, most of them dont have the luxury to consider internet or stealing a connection ... but my guess is that you were not referring to them, right?

  • 叮噹叔叔 (令狐叮噹)

    。。。

    (continued) ... yes, true, we saw many of them online via their phones in the buses, in the subway, or just idly squatting on the side walks, using whatever means they could, however, they are not the people on this site ... and definitely not those on this thread who want to steal a connection ...

    This video is NOT about China, but it might explain (as well as confuse) what I had said ...

    I am Mumbai

    [embed]http://v.youku.com/v_show/id_XNDIxNzEwNjU2.html[/embed]

    However, interestingly ..

    Good for you people I pay the same as you

    So, the Witch is not in UK?

  • 随便叫兽
    随便叫兽 wrote:

    But he didn't "jump across where the river was narrower", je jumped on the back of some poor guy, who maybe could afford the smallest bandwidth... and now has to carry him on his back.

    He doesn't have to. He could use a wired ethernet connection, or he could discipline his slutty wireless router so that it doesn't accept connections from everyone on the block. But in all likelihood, Zhou Average isn't going to notice someone riding his connection unless Zhou Average is actually using all of his bandwidth (read: data piracy).

    Bear in mind that the spectrum of wireless signals is finite; too many, and they interfere with one another. The American FCC's hegemony over the airwaves is what prevented wireless technologies from proliferating decades earlier. But maybe the FCC was right. Perhaps only people who actually understand how a router works should be allowed to operate a wireless one. Oh, but then Apple users won't be able to pretend to work on their screenplays at coffee shops, because baristas can't be fucked to care about bandwidth parsimony.

    Or maybe people should just learn how to share.

    Beijing could have public WiFi if they didn't cripple their networks with censorware.

    It's just a bad allegory, so please don't take it too serious. ^^ I just don't like parasites... there are already enough of them in this world.. -.-

    ISPs are the actual parasites, and everyone who pays for Internet access is contributing to the problem.

  • 叮噹叔叔 (令狐叮噹)

    ...

    (continued) ... you are welcomed to talk about poverty across the world, but I am sure you dont agree with the rich (or parasite) stealing from the poor ...

    Actually I dont know since I'm expat and living in a hotel apartment.

    I applaud you for still knowing that there are people struggling every day ... FYI, as an expat couple trying to make a living in China, we pay RMB1000 for a one-year plan which might have been RMB100 per month ...

  • 叮噹叔叔 (令狐叮噹)

    。。。

    Hahahahaha ... my guess is that he (she?) is one of those with (at least) one notebook (or Mac Air), one iPhone, one iPod or iPad, and downloading 24x7 all the time ...

    What about asking for password and sharing the costs..?!

    Sorry, dont mean to be rude, but this is China ...

  • DonkeyTonk
    DonkeyTonk wrote:

    Make friends with your neighbour and donate him some beer in exchange

  • 随便叫兽
    随便叫兽 wrote:

    read OPs start posting, obviously he has a secured wireless connection in range, now he's looking for some way to crack the security. I just criticized this attidude,

    I saw the OP ask for some esoteric information, and then a bunch of people accused him of a tangentially related non-crime, because they have limited imaginations.

    As a citizen of the Internet, I'm not going to sit back while people who don't know what the fuck they're talking about pretend they have more of a right to be here than someone who "leeches" from open hotspots, is lucky enough to live in a place with free access, or even someone who exploits network vulnerabilities.

    One might speculate that the cracker is going to use their access for illegal activities like trafficking in child pornography or inciting ethnoreligious violence, but that's quite a fucking leap in logic. A comparatively shorter one would be to conclude that anyone who hoards something as ephemeral as bandwidth has optimized their connection to download movies and music in circumvention of copyright law and is therefore a metaphorical "thief" as well. And as we know, there is no honor among thieves.

  • 叮噹叔叔 (令狐叮噹)

    ...

    (continued) ... it comes down to, if the owner of the connection is concerned about people stealing the connection, hence set up security on it, then other people should respect that and stay away from it, instead of trying to hack and steal it anyway ...

    On the other hand, if any particular owner feels generous or safe enough for others to piggyback on their connections, then that's their choice ...

    I am 99.9999% sure that we each have a password to WLIB ... if someone wants to piggyback on your WLIB account, for whatever reasons and purposes he/she might have, would it be OK to do so?

  • 随便叫兽
    随便叫兽 wrote:

    I don't worry about his intentions, accessing open networks would be also no problem... but the specific question for "password cracking software" implies some criminal energy.

    It implies a disregard for technical rules. That is not criminal in and of itself. Don't let Anonymous find out that you would apply prior restraint to hacktivism. Besides, there are plenty of white hat hackers out there. That's how shit gets fixed, eventually.

    If the victim would be some ISP or some company, this also might be ok, at least for me, but the victim would be some innocent, who (maybe) has not the knowledge how to protect himself.

    For the third time, the only individual "victims" who could potentially be noticeably affected by bandwidth leeching are pirates. Why do you persist in trying to drum up sympathy for a dumber kind of make-believe thief?

    What you proclaim is some sort of "survival of the fittest" in a new way. Don't know, whether this is the way, we should or want to go. But of course this discussion becomes a little bit esoteric... ;D

    I don't see what's new about it besides the flashy lights and clicky buttons. But on the bright side, plenty of soulless technocrats recognize the inherent value of open standards and non-proprietary technology, which is what the Internet is built upon. Time spent complaining about leeches is time better spent complaining about ACTA and other threats to online freedom.

  • 随便叫兽
    随便叫兽 wrote:

    Disregard of technical rules indeed, but as I described before, I criticized his attitude.

    You only did so post hoc in responding to my taking issue with people who think Internet access is a privilege rather than a right. Notice that I'm not helping OP, because he did not provide me with pornography.

    And while his reasons for questioning is clear, comparing this topic with Anonymous's makes no sense, because their reasons are more of a way of fighting against internet capitalism...

    Oh, how I wish that were true, but Anonymous is insufferably post-leftist. What Anonymous would take issue with, however, is prior restraint on Internet technologies and artificially imposed limitations on digital freedoms. Plus they really like to take advantage of anti-hacker hysteria.

    I cannot determine such an intention in this case. Don't think, Anonymous would "steal" a poor chinese guys limited bandwith. ^^

    What makes you think that is the only thing OP can use it for, and why -- for the third time -- have you ignored the equally plausible scenario that this poor Chinese guy is "stealing" movies and music from American artists and thus not nearly as innocent as you want us to believe?

    herp derp that's social Darwinism, but new!

    I don't see what's new about it besides the flashy lights and clicky buttons. But on the bright side, plenty of soulless technocrats recognize the value of open standards and non-proprietary technology, which is what the Internet is built upon.

    No reason for going on their level. For fighting them, of course... but we should be aware of hitting the wrong!

    Let me rephrase that: Hackers understand the intrinsic collectivist value of sharing. It seems that ignorant reifying meatbags do not. If the former exploits the latter, I won't shed a fucking tear. Hopefully that's because I'll have cybereyes like the chick from the Sprawl trilogy and my tear ducts will be rerouted to my mouth so I'd spit when I'd cry.

  • 叮噹叔叔 (令狐叮噹)

    。。。

    Hahahahaha ... so ....

    --- did aravinda get the software at the end?

    --- is it right or wrong for him to get such software?

    --- is Dando going to shave his head, again?

    --- is it going to rain tomorrow?

    ... stay tuned, for the answers to all these mysteries ...

  • 叮噹叔叔 (令狐叮噹)

    ...

    Hahahahaha ... 260 per month? You have to be fairly rich ...

  • 叮噹叔叔 (令狐叮噹)

    。。。

    (continued) ... now that I am a smart (phone) user, I use "mobile network" from my phone whe I am on the road, and both weibo and weixin can get fairly good speed (even Android market if I am lucky), both above and below ground in the subway, except then the carriage moves into the tunnel ...

    By the way, our 2G phone plan with China Mobile is RMB 128 per month, and it includes about 400MB per month ...

    Q ... I still beat you on "head count", we have two people in our household :)

  • 叮噹叔叔 (令狐叮噹)

    。。。

    (continued) ... I just saw this on weibo (and I think there are many similar ones out there) ... but I have not verified it yet ...

    【Free public wifi】:

    China Mobile (not too sure what "card number" means):[br] Card number: 15821275836[br] Password: 159258

    China Telecom[br] When and wherever your device can locate the wifi signal called "chinanet" (of China Telecom), you can use this account:[br] Account: 07953591377[br] Password: 3591377

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