Discussion » All non BJ languages » English teacher qualification standards to rise

  • Lao Lee
    Lao Lee wrote:
    <p>In major cities like Beijing and Shanghai, however, the Chinese government is upping its standards, said Carrie Kellenberger, the global director of recruiting for Reach To Teach Recruiting who previously taught in China from 2003 to 2006. Teachers must be at least 24 years old, have one or two years of formal teaching experience after graduation and obtain a certificate to teach English as a foreign language, or TEFL.</p> <p>"In the past, you could be a college graduate and have no teaching experience and have no problem getting a position in China," Kellenberger said. "The demand for English teachers is rising every day in China, but the Chinese government has made the whole job application process a lot more difficult."</p> <p><a href="http://asia-jobs.fins.com/Articles/SBB0001424052970204422404576597033248546262/China-s-Insatiable-Demand-for-English-Teachers">http://asia-jobs.fins.com/Articles/SBB0001424052970204422404576597033248546262/China-s-Insatiable-Demand-for-English-Teachers</a></p>
  • №❶ Passioη

    This is not bad news at all...

    as usual this is an experimental policy... likely to be changed or intensified in the next few years. If US China trade relations get worsened by the current counter-currency devaluation bill, It will be added that US accent is not good enough for English teaching in China...

    Buckle up or get set to be focked!

  • 随便叫兽
    随便叫兽 wrote:

    That's not a new regulation. Those are the requirements for obtaining a Z visa as an English teacher. It's been that way for as long as I've been here.

    Reach to Teach is following the relevant Chinese laws and regulations! Good for them.

  • №❶ Passioη

    which country of southeast asia will give you the cheap labour and promising large market as china does? which will create such a large demand for English teachers? security, social, political and economic stability? NONE can give you all those factors in one basket...

    That's why foreign companies will be stuck here as harsh CPC policies and encounters drive them out one after the other, then they'll switch to alternatives like Thailand, Indonesia, Malaysia and the Philippines...

  • Pavoir Sponse
    Pavoir Sponse wrote:

    Most of my English teaching involves teaching college-level Sociology to fairly decent English speakers.

    My Uni seem quite happy with my work though

  • Pavoir Sponse
    Pavoir Sponse wrote:

    I'm working with a leading Beijing Uni teaching English and Journalism.

    I guess the point I'm making is that when I look back on my English lesson plans they all seem to be like Sociology, as opposed to Language based and occasionally I feel slightly fraudulent for it.

    But the school seems happy, as do the students, and I like to think I do a little more than 'just chat about shit' (which is what some would claims is all Sociologists do anyway).

  • 随便叫兽
    随便叫兽 wrote:

    If anyone should have sociology jammed into every available orifice, it's future journalists. Sounds like you're doing the Lord's work.

  • Father Of Boring

    If anyone should have sociology jammed into every available orifice, it's future journalists. Sounds like you're doing the Lord's work.

    Amen Hallelujah glory be His name.  Cram it in there.  

  • Pavoir Sponse
    Pavoir Sponse wrote:

    Yeah, and have got a Sociology degree, and a flimsy post-grad journalism certificate. And I think they learn more this way, rather than say doing endless grammar lessons. Though, I'm not beyond the hung-over, 'let's do some role-play.'

    No, not in that way, though the mind does wander.

  • 随便叫兽
    随便叫兽 wrote:

    Not all who wander are lost.

    Oh... not that kind of roleplaying...

  • Father Of Boring

    I'm on board with Astaroth about the supply and demand thing.  You could hire the entire unemployed population of the West and they still wouldn't be able to teach all these people English.  I have a hard time believing the government will actually be able to enforce these rules.

    However, given what I understand of the awareness of language in this country, any change in the standards is a good thing.  The more the government pushes this, the more people will begin to question whether paying out the ass to have their kids shoved in front of a random non-Asian individual is an intrinsic good.  And that's what will kill these "fly-by-night" schools.  I really think the government has cleaned up their pedagogical principles.  On a lot of forums you'll see English teachers 不解 about why their students believe such random bullcrap about language learning.  

    It's the big training schools and about 15 years of vicious, disingenuous advertising on their part.  The "fly-by-night" schools are remoras stuck on their backs.  The misguided linguists who formulated government educational policy in the 1980's jumped ship and ran straight to the training schools, and since then, on the back of a well-meaning but misguided policy of mandatory English education, the ousted planners have worked with spammers and marketers to promote ridiculous, ugly, insane beliefs about how you, too, can get magically good at English if only you'll give us your money.  The government deserves credit for recognizing its mistake, and I think they've honestly been trying to correct it, given the changes in the national curriculum, changes in the tests, and changes in teacher training programs.  The education planners in the Ministry of Education are hardly responsible for things like this: http://www.newyorker.com/reporting/2008/04/28/080428fa_fact_osnos  

    The only thing that's going to kill this is better standards.  There will always be a place for private trainers, polishing classes, and informal English training.  That, given the national college entrance exams, will never go away, and even Japan and Korea don't have standards as stringent as these new ones, and we all know about the informal EFL market in those two countries.  What those countries lack that China has in spades is big, national English-training organizations with shameless marketing departments.  If the fact that teachers should be qualified becomes more widely known, it can only be a good thing.

    But what would serve this country even better than stricter standards for teaching is an international panel of linguists with a PR budget and access to government media channels.  Counteracting the lies these "schools" tell is going to take years of public re-education.  Contact your local Propaganda Ministry representative and let them know please.

  • 随便叫兽
    随便叫兽 wrote:

    Having been a roguish and shitty English teacher for three years, jumping from one fly-by-night training school to another like a rat jumping from a sinking ship, to flotsam, to lily pad, I agree that standards should be raised. If the standard English curriculum wasn't total and utter shit, then parents wouldn't be so quick to send their children--who have no assholes--to worthless redneck refuse like yours truly for supplemental instruction that basically revolves around going through New Interchange 2 for the umpteenth time because nobody tutors the same student for more than a few months and the student is too polite (or lazy) to apprise the tutor of the situation. And when they do, it ABSOLUTELY HAS to be on a day when the tutor is hung over. Fucking shit.

    As it stands, some of the best English speakers I know have developed their talent not by paying for after school tutoring, but just by sitting on their asses watching TV and playing videogames... in English, of course, but at an individual pace nonetheless.

    But as P.T. Barnum said, "There's a sucker born every minute." Here's your sideshow freak, 富二代!

    Still. This is a misleading thread. There are no new regulations.

  • Pavoir Sponse
    Pavoir Sponse wrote:

    Agree, most of those language schools are pretty disgraceful.

    Obviously the raising of standards is a good thing, but I think it is worth mentioning that there are Englsh teachers out here with no degrees, formal qualfications, or experience that still teach pretty well, especially when compared with the curriculumn standards that Dando mentions.

    Of course, there are lots of useless cowboys who barely have decent English themselves, but having a Tefl certificate does not make make you a good English Teacher per se. By the same token I have met some really good Chinese tutors without qualifications who do a great job.

    Ah, New Interchange, those were the days. I actually enjoyed teaching with those books...

  • 随便叫兽
    随便叫兽 wrote:

    That Crazy English dude is a wife beater, isn't he?

  • Pavoir Sponse
    Pavoir Sponse wrote:

    Yeah, but she was white so it doesn't count...

  • Father Of Boring

    And didn't he have like 5 kids or something?

  • Micky
    Micky wrote:

    No matter the standard you may suggest here, it will take Chinese another 50years to fully understand that your skin color (being you white, black, yellow or red) will not make you a (good) teacher.

    Even if the standard is raised, it will only knock out the smaller ones out of business leaving it only for the CPC members to run. And they’ll still look for the white skinned blue eyed person to confuse the parents about the New Interchange and New Concept English.

    My concern is which accent Chinese people will have when they finally embrace English language as second or official language.

     

  • 随便叫兽
    随便叫兽 wrote:

    "being white doesnt mean you are no longer required to have the qualifications to teach English...this city is awaken!"

    I repeat: nothing changed. The "new rules" quoted upstairs are the same rules necessary for obtaining a Z visa and foreign expert certificate in any field. It's been this way for years.

    The representative of one school said his organization was following the rules. And it's probably just PR bullshit, anyway.

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