Discussion » Chinese Language & Culture » Chinese Philosophy... "Western" Ideas?

  • Captain America
    Captain America wrote:
    <p>Laozi [Lao Tzu], the sixth century B.C. Laozi articulated a political philosophy that has come to be known as wuwei, or inaction. "Rule a big country as you would fry a small fish," he said. That is, don't stir too much. "<strong>The more prohibitions there are, the poorer the people become</strong>," he wrote in his magnum opus, the "Daodejing." [Tao de Ching]</p> <p>According to MIT economist Yasheng Huang, "When measured by factors that directly track the living standards of the average Chinese person, China has performed the best when it pursued liberalizing, market-oriented economic reforms, as well as conducted modest political reform, and <strong>moved away from statist policies</strong>."</p> <p>The rule of law has deteriorated with a crackdown on dissent. Perhaps not coincidentally, this has also been a period of slowing growth and rampant inflation, fueling greater concerns about both the economy and social stability.</p> <p>For Mencius, a fourth-century B.C. philosopher and the most famous student of Confucius, a kingdom would be able to defend itself from outside attack if the king "runs a <strong>government benevolent to the people</strong>, sparing of punishments and fines, reducing taxes and levies. . . ." When asked by the King of Hui, "What virtue must there be to win the unification of the world?" Mencius replied, "It is the<strong> protection of the people</strong>."</p> <p>Much later we find the writings of Huang Zongxi (1610-1695), known as "The Father of Chinese Enlightenment." A fierce critic of despotism and the divine rights of sovereigns, Huang once rhetorically asked, "Is it that the heaven and the earth with all their magnitude are destined only in favor of one person or one family among all the people?"</p> <p>From a <a href="http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052702304760604576427931129537282.html?mod=googlenews_wsj">Wall Street Journal article</a> written by a Chinese scholar in Beijing. My best wishes for his safety.</p>
  • 随便叫兽
    随便叫兽 wrote:

    Had me until "statist policies." Nothing good ever comes from WSJ's op-ed page. Fuck them with Milton Friedman's dick.

  • Ejdnzlaj
    Ejdnzlaj wrote:

    A sort of interesting read, but to be honest it'd be just as easy to write a Western Philosophy, "Chinese" Ideas article

  • 随便叫兽
    随便叫兽 wrote:

    That's not really my beef, @Cap'n. I think all policy is "statist". What state authors policy to its own detriment? It's a shallow catchphrase, with a not-so-subtle meaning that market regulation is always harmful.

    I also think it's rather shallow for them to characterize Chinese culture as one that is intrinsically capitalistic.

    For instance, of the Four Occupations:

    The merchants, traders, and peddlers of goods were viewed by the scholarly elite as essential members of society, yet were placed on the lowest of the four grades in the official Chinese social hierarchy, due to the view that they do not produce anything, only profit from others' creations

    @Scott, I fail to see how it's "arbitrary" to dismiss articles from a known source of cryptofascist propaganda; WSJ's op-ed section on the same level of credibility as the usual shrill denunciations of Western hegemony in the state papers here. Wall Street Journal is a known quantity in business news. But no one with any sense for credibility really takes the Opinion section of the paper seriously.

  • Mari Vidste
    Mari Vidste wrote:

    @Dando, you lost me at 'cryptofascist propaganda' -- itself a shallow catchphrase used only by intellectual weaklings when they feel threatened by the mere voicing of a contrary opinion.

  • 随便叫兽
    随便叫兽 wrote:

    @Cap'n:

    Q: "Who is characterizing Chinese culture as intrinsically capitalistic?"

    A: The WSJ op-ed page. Put on a tinfoil hat and read between the lines, man.

    Although perhaps I'm hanging on the "statist policies" bit and "sparing of taxes and levies". My point is WSJ does have a tendency of equivocating economic 'freedom to' with freedom in general. I'm only working with the quoted bits, because I would sooner hit my dick with a hammer than give WSJ even one of my fake emails.

    But I certainly agree that the primary objectives can be accomplished through a socialist mode of development. Capitalists love Eurosocialism. Ex IMF chief Dominic Strauss-Kahn was a favorite for France's Socialist party, after all.

    Also, I was an Orientalist before it was cool; the Chinese anticipated medical marijuana by a matter of millenia.

    @Scott,

    "Certainly, you would say that dismissing any work of prose due to the appearance of a single word seems somewhat unfair."

    For one thing, "statist policies" is a two word phrase, not "a single word."

    So I had you until "had me until" and you ignored the second sentence saying nothing good comes from the WSJ op-ed page? My, oh my. Someone has a short attention span.

    @Conan, I wasn't aware that something could be a catchphrase until it actually fucking catches on. That's going to be a tall fucking order, 'cuz all of my catchphrases are coated in KY Jelly. The first dull rumble of the approaching communist buggernaut and you're already covering your cornhole? Who feels threatened?

    Google search result #3 alleges The Sound of Music as one example of such.

    I feel safe.

  • Mari Vidste
    Mari Vidste wrote:

    @Dando,

    KY? No. YOU caught it and joined the masses of other leftarded word-bent nerds who have been slinging 'cryptofascist' for a long time.

    Who feels threatened?

    Who won't even read the article? Who is all irrational over the reputation of some newspaper brand's opinion page? Even the world's saddest dumbasses sometimes puke up a useful tidbit. Read some John Stuart Mill, freedom-lover.

  • Mari Vidste
    Mari Vidste wrote:

    And...Yes. The Sound of Music. I've seen it. 8 times. With my mother. And every time cried tears of joy as the brave Von Trapps escape into the mountains in their curtain clothes.

    It's a wonderful film.

  • 随便叫兽
    随便叫兽 wrote:

    @Conan,

    What's irrational about disregarding information from disreputable sources? How often do you find yourself combing through the op-ed pages of the Daily Handshake for useful tidbits?

    I think I'll continue to troll and leave it up to the enlightened mystics to distill the vital essence.

  • 随便叫兽
    随便叫兽 wrote:

    @Cap'n, "Overabundance of words?" I was responding to three different people, chief. Wanna do a word count?

    Strauss-Kahn being a Socialist party member AND the former head of an international financing firm should inspire quite a bit of cognitive dissonance for typical right-wing Americunts who are used to thinking of socialism and capitalism as antithetical. Get it? Are ya picking up what I'm laying down?

  • Mari Vidste
    Mari Vidste wrote:

    @Captain Dumbfuck,

    Please do not mention my name in your posts of fail. And do not impose your toddler-brain logic ('if I'm a feminist, girls will want to fuck me') on Dando, who is smarter than your family tree.

  • 随便叫兽
    随便叫兽 wrote:

    Shorter Cap'n: NO CONAN UR GAY AND RETARDED

  • 随便叫兽
    随便叫兽 wrote:

    ITT pretend-American OP farts into his own echo chamber.

  • Mari Vidste
    Mari Vidste wrote:

    I'm Conan the Librarian. I wear a pocket protector. I also hike up my polyesters to separate my balls with the inseam. I jerk off to Kant.

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