Discussion » Beijing Life » Snappy Comments for Line/Queue-Jumpers?

  • Skaught
    Skaught wrote:
    <p>No doubt each one of you has had someone cut in front of you in line on numerous occassions. I know that 95% of the general Chinese public hates this crap as much as I do, but no one ever says anything to the perpetrator, so they continue this behavior unabated. Since the shop workers never do anything either (except at Starbucks! bless your heart, foreign franchise), the responsibility falls&nbsp;to the victims to actually do something about it.</p> <p>I've been dying to learn some witty, funny comments in Chinese to say to the line-jumpers, and I was hoping y'all might offer some suggestions. "Excuse me, I'm in line" is not going to 'cut' it. I want to mock them. I once asked a friend to translate "Am I invisible?", thinking that it might&nbsp;be funny&nbsp;since I'm a tall white guy, but my friend correctly&nbsp;noted that sarcasm&nbsp;rarely&nbsp;works with these folks.</p> <p>Any&nbsp;suggestions? If you could include pinyin with tones (i.e. ni3 hao3)&nbsp;with an English equivalent, I would appreciate your help so much. Some American comments of this nature:<br /><br />"Where's the fire?"<br />"Keep your pants on."<br />"Go ahead. Looks like you need&nbsp;this more than me."<br /><br />My goal is slight humiliation, just enough that they'll think twice before doing it next time, but not so much of a loss of face that they're going to want to fight. Thanks in advance.&nbsp;<br />+10 harmony points for the winning line</p>
  • Ejdnzlaj
    Ejdnzlaj wrote:

    You have to be direct:
    "ni3 zhi1 dao4 zen3me pai4 dui4 ma?" 

  • №❶ Passioη

    hehe, it seems you also have to learn how to say "I don't really speak chinese but I got that phrase just for you queue-jumpers"... I mean: What happens if after you say your "slight humiliation" phrase and they reply in chinese (perhaps also in a friendly way) which you don't understand? hmmm that would make anyone look silly...

    1. For starters you dont often have to be in a queue with chinese people.

    2. If you close up the space in front, no one will jump the queue (especially if you're that tall).

  • pommie
    pommie wrote:

    - - - "ni3 zhi1 dao4 zen3me pai4 dui4 ma?"

    That means "Do you know how to party?"

  • Ejdnzlaj
    Ejdnzlaj wrote:

    oops! I meant "pai2 dui4"

    Thankyou for teaching another way to say party though. I only knew 聚会 before

  • 叮噹叔叔 (令狐叮噹)

    ...

    Hahahahahaha ... it depends on the individual ... and the "distance" ...

    I will consider that this person cannot be taught a lesson, but, I can still have some fun with him/her ...

    Then if the person, whether male or female, is right in front of me, I will laugh ... starting with a giggle, and then laugh louder and louder ... I found that this is a good way to release the "anger" while also creating a fear in the other person's mind, as he/she has no idea what this is about ...

    Yeah... I know ... this is creepy ...

  • Tina
    Tina's猫 wrote:

    just simply and directly say "ni hao,pai dui!"

  • Simen Wangberg

    I'm old enough...to party. Although someone told me that pai4 dui4 isn't really a "common" way to say party, and that ju4 hui4 is more common. But whatdoIknow. The only time I've ever said anything to someone cutting in line, it was just like "EHHHH?", which is apparently universal for "you're a dick".

  • pommie
    pommie wrote:

    la di da day
    we like to pai dui

  • Da Fan
    Da Fan wrote:

    if the jumper cut from right in front of me, I'll say "我好象在你前面吧?" and wait for his/her response. if it comes out to be kind, we are cool. if it comes out to be rude, "赶紧滚蛋!" is my response. if the jumper cut the line from other places and it seems that no one's care, well, I'll play the bad guy.

  • Da Fan
    Da Fan wrote:

    well, one-on-one or one-on-two is fine for me, but if obvious the jumper gets many friends, I'll say nothing...亡命徒也要命不是

  • Tina
    Tina's猫 wrote:

    Tina: Then he answers " Sorry, I am not pai dui, You've got a wrong person. Im XX. Nice to meet you. Are you trying to seduce me?"

    haha,.ROKOIOKO.i didn't think about that,since you brought up this possibility that the jumper is trying to play a fool and disrespect us, we need at least get ready for it, so we could probably say :

    You are not even on my list to be seduced,so  GET IN THE LINE AND WAIT!

  • Da Fan
    Da Fan wrote:

    I'm not strong, in the US, I'm just the average. And you don't want to fight in the US, cops will arrest you, and dudes you are fighting with may have guns. so comparatively it's safer to have a fight in China, esp. in Beijing isn't it? they got no guns, cops don't care, then it's just for fun, haha

  • Tina
    Tina's猫 wrote:

    “赶紧滚蛋”is definitely the flame start a fight..........

  • Jeremy
    Jeremy wrote:

    I used to live in a city with almost no laowais in Shandong and I would sometimes say "中国人优先吗?" and it would work quite well. The bad thing about this is that other people in the queue would start talking to me or staring at me even more once they would hear that I can speak some chinese.

    I do not believe that the people who don't pai dui care whether you are Chinese or not though.

  • Martin Svean
    Martin Svean wrote:

    well line jumping does nto happen much lately since the shalympics.

    but if it does I will politely use my thumb and direct them to the back of the line

    if someone tries still to get in front of me, then i well put my frame between them and the attendant.

    if someone tries to put their money out over my shoulder or get serviced before me, i will physically push their arm away and tell them to wait their turn.

     

    I am glad to see this final has changed in Beijing. i don't know about the rest of the country. but if you like to jump a line, please go to the usa and try it and see who says what.

    line jumping in the states may get you heavily insulted or even get whacked by someone.

     

    nobody likes this so its about time that people learned how to wait. For a long time, i got the impression that here nobody gave a fuck about waiting in line. but now its changed.

    besides, with my schedule, i go to work, return or go shopping when most people are at their jobs. so lines don't usually exists ;)

  • Jeremy
    Jeremy wrote:

     @.rOkOIOkO. then I would suddenly become a gentleman and say 女士优先 and let them be first ;)

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