Discussion » All non BJ languages » Why do kindergarden teachers not require a degree?

  • SoulCreative Web Studios
    SoulCreative Web Studios wrote:

    Hey everyone,

    I am a sophomore in college, and I was planning to continue my education online while living in China. Naturally, I am planning to get a job in China to finance this, but the only jobs I am offered is teaching Kindergarten.

    I am find with teaching younger kids, and I would not mind it. Also, I realize that you must have completed your degree before teaching at official institutions, but I must ask why you don't need a degree to teach younger children? Are these programs ligitimate?

     

    Thanks,

     

    Daniel Lessor

  • Jacopo DR
    Jacopo DR wrote:

    You don't???

    that's a pretty scary thing.

  • Simen Wangberg

    Actually, even a lot of the kindergarden positions usually require at least a bachelor's degree, although from what I understand, these kinds of things can be negotiated.

    Some of the schools are legit, others are not. Honestly, it's hard to say whether one is or isn't legit. You're better off finding someone that's actually worked at one of these places and asking them what's up.

    When I was looking at teaching, all the places I interviewed at required a bachelor's degree, so I can't really give you any useful information about actually working at one of these places that doesn't require one.

    What is your motivation in coming to China right now? I mean, wouldn't it be easier to find a job in the States while you're finishing your degree? It just seems like it'd be much more prudent to slug it out for a couple more years until you have your bachelor's, at which time you would have no problem finding a legitimate teaching job in China...if you still wanted to come here at that time.

    Also, about financing your education with the earnings from your job here - I don't know what schools you've talked to, but unless you really scrimp and save and generally live like a hobo, I think you're gonna have a rough time paying tuition on a kindergarden teacher's salary. Something to think about.

  • Minger
    Minger wrote:

    Daniel, you have to have a minimum of a bachelor's degree to have any legal job in China. Your company is going to fudge your credentials or get you a visitor visa (rather than a working visa) in order to get you here.

    Don't be discouraged though, there are no "laws" in this country of the kind your familiar with. Plenty of people work without the right documents. You'll probably be expected to lie about it though.

    So technically, you do need a degree to teach kindergarteners, but that doesn't matter because your coming to China.

  • Simen Wangberg

    "That being said, I would prefer not to lie, but would not have a huge trouble with this provided there were no serious consequences."

    That's the right attitude. You're right, the kindergardens usually do not require as many qualifications as other institutions.

    However - you should be prepared to lie to the parents of the kids that you're going to be teaching, as your employer will probably tell them that you not only have a university degree, but also years of experience in teaching.

    And you might want to lie about your occupation if any of the friendly denizens of this board ask you what you do. They might mistake you for a construction worker.

  • Simen Wangberg

    "What? A construction worker?

    Are you saying I look gay?"

    Hahaha. Nah, it's just a reference to some other folks on this board. Just let it slide.

  • Petter Meisfjordskar
    Ideally, it is very hard to find a university that teaches English as a major that makes any concentration on teaching these very young kids. This is more of a talent thing than a professional.
  • Minger
    Minger wrote:

    "That being said, I don't think I am going to be asked to lie. Most of the Upper level programs ask for a bachelors degree, but several kindergarten programs do not ask of this. This tells me that their requirements aren't as keen."

    No, it tells you that they're less legitimate. The degree is a legal requirement. Don't let it trouble you though; no one else does.

    If you want to start your own trading company than you probably have the right idea. There are no trading companies / sourcing companies that I'm aware of that will offer what Americans consider competitive wages to employees though, so you have to be the boss. Otherwise, the best salaries to trade company sourcers I know of are at about 20,000 RMB per month.

     

  • Hans Christian Eriksson

    莫明 That is not true , as long as u are white and u can sing  and dance to make the kids happy, u can have a teaching job  easily  here. It is what  all what non degree holders  do here.  U do not need a degree at all to teach. U can be a villager, or street cleaner, or whatever in ur country, if u come here u can teach. 

    Being an english native speaker, and holding  a bachelor degree will not only give u the boading pass for higher salary, but for a chance to teach in elementary or junior high schools.  Without degree, just eye the kindergardens

  • Hans Christian Eriksson

    Respondents to posts here have confirmed what i was supporting in my previous posts deleted by the admin. An african saying says: Truth is a bitter drink. If u give this bitter drink, they will reject it. Anyway, i still support that  that kindergardens teachers in china  are most of the time under educated people , and posts as well as those who  denied this before are now ironically admitting what i said.

    Quotations: "However - you should be prepared to lie to the parents of the kids that you're going to be teaching, as your employer will probably tell them that you not only have a university degree, but also years of experience in teaching."

    "Don't be discouraged though, there are no "laws" in this country of the kind your familiar with. Plenty of people work without the right documents. You'll probably be expected to lie about it though.

    So technically, you do need a degree to teach kindergarteners, but that doesn't matter because your coming to China"

     

     

     

  • Hans Christian Eriksson

    That is really a good idea Daniel. Don't be like many foreigners here who have been here for years  but can even ask their way when they loose their way. In addition, having a diploma will help u a lot

  • 叮噹叔叔 (令狐叮噹)

    ...

    Hahahaha ... I just thought of one reason for this ... maybe the parents, like their kids going to the kindy, are too stupid, naive and ignorant to care about actual qualification, but more about there is a foreigner teaching their kids ... then they can go to tell their friends at the golf club, "hey, some foreigner is teaching my 4-year-old", which is translated to "hey, I can afford to find a foreigner to teach my 4-year-old, so try to imagine how much money I have" ... or "... so try to imagine how smart is my child" ...

    ... something like that anyway ...

     

  • Simen Wangberg

    "hey, I can afford to find a foreigner to teach my 4-year-old, so try to imagine how much money I have"

    Yes. Exactly. That is exactly why many of these schools exist - and also one of many reasons why I quit my teaching job.

  • Petter Meisfjordskar
    Do the parents have any qualifications themselves?
  • Minger
    Minger wrote:

    Uncle D, you understand China too well...

    Cool, that is a very good question!

  • 叮噹叔叔 (令狐叮噹)

    ...

    Hahahaha ...

    Mike, sorry to hear you say that, but sadly, it is true ... this is similar to the "recruitment exercise" that Ming had done for his friend a while ago :)

    COOL ... if they have, it is more than likely a fake qualification that they bought online, which had raised another interesting question ...

    Ming ... actually, the girl in the "comic drawing" often told me that I dont understand China at all ...

  • 叮噹叔叔 (令狐叮噹)

    ...

    Hahahaha ...

    Mike, sorry to hear you say that, but sadly, it is true ... this is similar to the "recruitment exercise" that Ming had done for his friend a while ago :)

    COOL ... if they have, it is more than likely a fake qualification that they bought online, which had raised another interesting question ...

    Ming ... actually, the girl in the "comic drawing" often told me that I dont understand China at all ...

  • Petter Meisfjordskar
    Why i am asking is because any parent with such good schooling can easily tell the quality of the school he or she is sending the kid. I went to a school called leap in Chaoyang and i was so astonished there. The British lady told me point blank that the parents just want a person to teach their kids and that they always tell the parents that the teachers are far far qualified. So the teachers are forced to lie about their qualifications. I think it is a bragging issue among the rich Chinese that the kid is taught by a foreigner no matter what the kid is being taught.
  • Minger
    Minger wrote:

    Of course DD, anyone in your situation, and mine too to a lesser extend, should be fully aware that they simply do not understand China's unique national circumstances... :-D

  • 叮噹叔叔 (令狐叮噹)

    ...

    Hahahaha ...

    COOL ... liars liars everywhere, especially China ... even some of the smartest, most intelligent people can fall into traps or get into trouble, so although I understand what you meant, I doubt that it would help ...

    Ming ... for some reasons, everytime I read "circumstances", my eyes transmitted the word "circumcision" to my brain, heehee ... ouch ...

  • Petter Meisfjordskar

    Circumcision!!!! Ops.

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