Discussion » Music » MOTOWN 50 YEARS DOWN

  • COOL 凉快
    COOL 凉快 wrote:
    For more than 50 years, the world has danced and snapped its fingers to the chart-topping R&B hits of Motown Records and its iconic feel-good sound.

    In 1959, Berry Gordy Jr. began the Motown story as a songwriter-producer under a different label with a little encouragement from a friend and fellow music maker. One year later, he incorporated under the name that we know today. The man behind the music gave his first headquarters and studio a fun nickname that was a real hit too.

    Over the years, showstoppers such as the Supremes, Michael Jackson, Erykah Badu and even Bruce Willis have signed with the legendary label. Take a walk (or dance!) down memory lane and get reacquainted with Motown artists of yesteryear and today.
  • 随便叫兽
    随便叫兽 wrote:
    Motown was successful because all the performers were so meticulously handled so they could be presented to mainstream white audiences as non-threatening assimilated people of color.

    Have you seen the Motor City recently? It's not exactly an iconic feel-good place.

    Shit is inauthentic.
  • Petter Meisfjordskar
    No man, not yet.
  • Pete DeMola
    Pete DeMola wrote:
    I like Motown as much as the next guy, but what really confuses me is the recent trend in which users copy text from other sources and drop it on the forums with neither context or accreditation.

    It's just strange to me. I mean, you can't organize your thoughts coherently enough on your own?

    Rant over.

    *walks away whistling*



  • Amber
    Amber wrote:
    meow.................
  • Pavoir Sponse
    Pavoir Sponse wrote:
    Ha. Peter you bitch ;)
  • Amber
    Amber wrote:
    whould u be a dear and say something nice ? peter?
  • 随便叫兽
    随便叫兽 wrote:
    This is recent?

    I noticed that the OP sounded like copypasta from a Detroit tourism guide, but I guess I'm used to it.
  • Pete DeMola
    Pete DeMola wrote:
    Amber
    "Something nice."
  • Amber
    Amber wrote:
    i get dizzy, help!
  • Petter Meisfjordskar
    I think writing down here does not have rules of where to extract the material. It is a matter of sharing ideas from anywhere you can get them. For people that have straight brains, and know music and Motown, i am sure they will not complain, and will be glad at this.

    So Mr Peter, just get the shit off the bench because we can think, create and write far more than you can think.
  • Pete DeMola
    Pete DeMola wrote:
    It appears that someone can't take any criticism.

    Lighten up, COOL. It doesn't take Herculean efforts to credit your sources, nor should it be grounds for angry defensive posturing and launching ad hominem attacks.

    Rest assured: After I finish my dinner, I will proceed to "get the shit off the bench."

    But don't be surprised when I contact you later to determine exactly what that entails.

    *Googles "Getting Shit Off the Bench Guide for Dummies*
  • 随便叫兽
    随便叫兽 wrote:
    We?

    As in, the royal 'we'?
  • Joakim Berg Solum
    "So Mr Peter, just get the shit off the bench because we can think, create and write far more than you can think."

    I think an "ad hominem attack" would be warranted in this case. The irony of a guy who copy-pasted an Internet article and claimed it as his own, now criticizing someone else for lacking creative thought is kind of profound.

    *sits back with my bowl of popcorn*
  • Joakim Berg Solum
    We are not amused....
  • Peter S 李贝勒
    the motown sound is James Jamerson...

    http://bass-soup.com/?p=14

    “James Jamerson is one of the most revered bassists of all time. As a session player for the Motown label – Jamerson can be heard with a huge range of artists from the likes of Stevie Wonder to the Jackson 5. His prominence on the Motown label during the 1960’s and early 1970’s is such that in some quarters he’s believed to have played on 95% of all recordings - being favoured by Holland-Dozier production team. Whether 95% is accurate is open to debate Jamerson however did proceed to become one of the most influential bassists of all time and to this day is often cited as an influence by modern bassists.
    At his most prolific during his time with Motown, his grooves and tone have a unique style attributed to Jamerson’s technique and love of syncopated rhythms and Jazz style melody. Jamerson’s technique was centered around his use of his right hand index finger (nicknamed the hook). His Motown contributions include the likes of “My Girl” by the Temptations, “What’s going on” by Marvin Gaye and “For once in my life” by Stevie Wonder. Jamerson’s grooves were at odds to the simpler bass lines prominent in popular music at the time which in later years has singled out his contribution during the period.

Please login to post a reply to this thread.

WeLiveInBeijing

WeLiveInBeijing.com is a social community for people living in or traveling to Beijing.

Powered by: Bloc